Okay, So I've started to see a trickle of activity in the 10gb ethernet world. We are building out a new datacenter, and for the backup network we are using 1gb edge switches with the entire core in 10gb. I have the option of linking our backup media servers probably about 10 of them or so directly into the core of the fabric with a 10gbs drop. I was wondering what kind of throughput people are seeing in the real world with 10gb NIC cards in servers. I am hoping that a 10gb ethernet connection might allow for LTO3 drives to be fed from the single ethernet pipe.

10 GIGABIT NETWORK FOR UNDER $50?!?

The real issue when we start talking about these speeds are the PCI busses in the media server. If I remember correctly, mhz 64bit PCI only has 4. Can a server shuffle that many bytes effectively? What kind of real world numbers are people seeing with these 10gb components. Thanks, Ryan. The real question comes to why put in 10GB if devices are not using all of 1GB already. Cost of the new tech as well as the new bugs may not be worth the hassle in a large network.

I would stick with 1GB for reliablity and cost for now. This could be done using 1gbs NICs, but there is the overhead of managing the links making sure backup client x is using interface y, making sure only 1 interface y job is running simultaneously, etc.

A single 10gbs link requires very little management beyond making sure enough jobs are running to keep the tape drives busy. Mostly, we are looking out to a year future, where a single tape drive crushes the bandwidth available in a 1gbs ethernet link, and also simultaneously reducing the administrative overhead.

Well, I know that the 10Gb ethernet was part of the largest sustained ethernet transfer ever done so far. It did 7. See the article here.

Theoretical vs. Actual Bandwidth: PCI Express and Thunderbolt

As for experience, none with my company. Not really Rule 1but certainly one of the low numbers: More bandwidth is always good. LTO3 is not next generation, it is current generation. I have a 6 drive slot LTO3 library somewhere on a truck heading my way If you aren't planning to buy them within the next 2 years, then you can expect LTO4 or whatever the next big thing isAlso covered is how that relates to throughput of a Wireless Link with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.

This raw data rate is chosen to include 8b10b Line Coding. When the 8b10b line coding is removed from the raw data stream by the Gigabit Ethernet chipset, this allows an uncoded payload of exactly 1. The Basic parameters of the Ethernet standard allow us to calculate the theoretical maximum throughput. However, we also lose some bandwidth from the preamble and the inter-frame gap.

They can be calculated as follows:. This raw capacity is that of the actual link itself. However, note that this is still not an accurate representation of what your customer can expect in the real world. Other factors will influence the real-world throughput. Note that for Wireless links such as Microwave, Radio, Millimeter Wave or Free Space Optics, the Airside Interface often uses different coding and modulation than the network side interface.

This difference is often due to limitations in the amount of RF spectrum available for example, a 40MHz, 56MHz, 60MHz, 80MHz or even MHz channel from the regulatory body and channel planning, the modulation used for example, up to QAM or QAM which affects both transmit power and receiver sensitivity, aggregation features such as MIMO or XPIC, and especially for longer links, the corresponding Link Budget between the two ends which includes the Antenna Gain at both sides, plus any losses caused by transmission waveguides, connectors, plus atmospheric fade effects.

Note that only some wireless technologies such as Free Space Optics FSO are capable of fully transparent transmission using the exact same modulation used on Fibre Optic networks, so the full 1. The advantages of transparent transmission is that throughput is easily predicted, and latency is the lowest possible as transmission is generally one bit at a time. For networking equipment where Jumbo Frames are supportedby increasing the MTU can deliver even more data on the same bandwidth link, thanks to the decreased amount of overhead by utilising a lower number of frames.

CableFree has over 21 years experience with real-world deployment of wireless for mission-critical applications, with thousands of commercial deployments worldwide. Skip to content. Gigabit Ethernet Net Data rate The Basic parameters of the Ethernet standard allow us to calculate the theoretical maximum throughput. Transparent Wireless Links Note that only some wireless technologies such as Free Space Optics FSO are capable of fully transparent transmission using the exact same modulation used on Fibre Optic networks, so the full 1.

For Further Information CableFree has over 21 years experience with real-world deployment of wireless for mission-critical applications, with thousands of commercial deployments worldwide. Share this: Click to email this to a friend Opens in new window Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window.

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email.I need a little bit of help again. I'm currently doing some testing with peer to peer 10gig speeds. Can anyone shed some light as to why i'm not seeing any higher speeds? Any help here is appreciated, thank you! What is the machine specs? How many users? Try the following tests Dont test with small files, small files are BAD for testing transfer speeds, you need to copy a large file between the two devices, if you copy a 4GB file and you get high numbers but low with smaller files, then the connection is working as expected.

It does soundd like you're nas disks could be the bottleneck. What raid setup are you running on the synology? Also what raid and disk speed can you get from the local Host?

The other thing to query is the type of transfer. If it's loads of small files then each one has a creation overhead in the filesystem, loads of these for small files can add up quick and drain from the full wire transfer speed.

Single big files have low filesystem overhead, so can get full sequential write speeds to peak for best throughput. You'll never see that in real life situations. Between the overhead of SMB or whatever file transfer protocol your using, the IO limits of your disks, and the realistic speeds of 10Gb links As others have mentioned, larger files will perform better as they require less overhead.

Run a benchmark on your RAID and see how fast it is. I had something similar with an equal logic array. On the nic driver for iscsi I disabled interrupt moderation and the performance was noticeably better. I have one machine with SAS 3. Did Windows updates in 5 minutes flat on first install.

One other thing I found out recently in my dealings with 10GbE back-end fabric is a tricky thing related to SMB and multiple network paths to a server. You actually need to tell SMB to favor the 10GbE or Infiniband, etc channel, otherwise it'll take the path of least resistance. My Backup Exec agents were using the back-end perfectly fine, but standard copies were always slower until I looked into this. Since this is going to be used for backup storage, I thought it would be okay to stick with SATA drives.

I'm planning on having SAS drives in the production systems. Try disabling flow control on the NIC card. I had a similar problem but for a SAN and it was for a local web app it was taking users 10 minutes to login in and then 5 min just to query a 1 page file. So I disabled flow control on the NIC and that solved our problem it takes users longer to type there login info than what it takes to load all the web app and query files.

I would strongly suggest that you switch it back to RAID A rebuild could take weeks on RAID5, all the while your risking another drive failure and losing your data. What puzzles me is on the initial transfer with no other files in the share, the transfer speeds hit 1.

All of these files are VHD's - 10gb. So Microsofts file transfer dialog is notoriously poor at accurately measure file transfer speeds. You'll see huge spikes and drops, and it all doesn't mean much.Also covered is how that relates to throughput of a Wireless Link with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.

This raw data rate is chosen to include 8b10b Line Coding. When the 8b10b line coding is removed from the raw data stream by the Gigabit Ethernet chipset, this allows an uncoded payload of exactly 1. The size of these frames regulates the maximum number of bytes to send together.

Bandwidth converter

The preamble is 8 bytes and is sent just before each and every frame. When the main body of the frame byte has been transferred the network devices want to send another one. Since Gigabit Ethernet is always at running full duplex we can at the same time receive frames simultaneously.

Plus, there is some more overhead is going on:. This means that we lose a total of 18 bytes in overhead for the Ethernet header in the beginning and the checksum at the end.

10gbe real world throughput

MTU is the payload that could be carried inside an Ethernet frame, see picture above. It is a common misunderstanding that MTU is the frame size, but really is the data inside the frame only.

If using ordinary IPv4 this header will be 20 bytes long. Adding the Interframe Gap and the Preamble gives 20 more. All of these are very important, but does cause an overhead at the same time. If each frame carries a maximum of bytes of user data this means that we could transfer data bytes per second frames x byte of datai. Let us look at that now:. So a lot less frames than the normal sized frames, but we will be able to carry more data inside each of the frames and by that reduce the network overhead.

Note that for Wireless links such as Microwave, Radio, Millimeter Wave or Free Space Optics, the Airside Interface often uses different coding and modulation than the network side interface. This difference is often due to limitations in the amount of RF spectrum available for example, a 40MHz, 56MHz, 60MHz, 80MHz or even MHz channel from the regulatory body and channel planning, the modulation used for example, up to QAM or QAM which affects both transmit power and receiver sensitivity, aggregation features such as MIMO or XPIC, and especially for longer links, the corresponding Link Budget between the two ends which includes the Antenna Gain at both sides, plus any losses caused by transmission waveguides, connectors, plus atmospheric fade effects.

Note that only some wireless technologies such as Free Space Optics FSO are capable of fully transparent transmission using the exact same modulation used on Fibre Optic networks, so the full 1. The advantages of transparent transmission is that throughput is easily predicted, and latency is the lowest possible as transmission is generally one bit at a time.

Skip to content. The Maximum Transmission Unit, MTU This means that we lose a total of 18 bytes in overhead for the Ethernet header in the beginning and the checksum at the end.

Transparent Wireless Links Note that only some wireless technologies such as Free Space Optics FSO are capable of fully transparent transmission using the exact same modulation used on Fibre Optic networks, so the full 1.In this article we will look at how much throughput of actual data we have on a Gigabit Ethernet based network and if this will increase by using Jumbo Frames.

The bandwidth on a Gigabit Ethernet network is defined that a node could send 1 bits each second, that is one billion 1 or 0s every second. The size of these frames regulates the maximum number of bytes to send together.

The maximum frame size for Ethernet has been byte for the last 25 years or more. Before each frame is sent there is certain combination of bits that must be transmitted, called the Preamblewhich basically signals to the receiver that a frame is coming right behind it.

The preamble is 8 bytes and is sent just before each and every frame. When the main body of the frame byte has been transferred we might want to send another one. This is called the Interframe Gap and is 12 bytes long. So on default Gigabit Ethernet we can transmit over full size frames each seconda quite impressive number. Since we are running full duplex we could at the same time receive frames too!

We shall continue to study the overhead for this. No, there is some more overhead that will be going on. The first 14 byte of the frame will be used for the Ethernet header and the last 4 bytes will contain a checksum trying to detect transfer errors.

This means that we lose a total of 18 bytes in overhead for the Ethernet header in the beginning and the checksum at the end. MTU is the payload that could be carried inside an Ethernet frame, see picture above. It is a common misunderstanding that MTU is the frame size, but really is the data inside the frame only.

Just behind the Ethernet header we will most likely find the IP header.

10gbe real world throughput

If using ordinary IPv4 this header will be 20 bytes long. And behind the IP header we will also most likely find the TCP headerwhich have the same length of 20 bytes. Adding the Interframe Gap and the Preamble gives 20 more. So for each bytes of data sent we have a minimum of 78 extra bytes handling the transfer at different layers. All of these are very important, but does cause an overhead at the same time.

If each frame carries a maximum of bytes of user data this means that we could transfer data bytes per second frames x byte of datai.What's new New posts New resources Latest activity. Resources Latest reviews Search resources.

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JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Status Not open for further replies. MauricioU Member. Joined May 22, Messages Also, for anyone using this as a guide, I deleted all the tunables I added and continued getting full 10Gbe throughput both ways with a stripe—which I take to mean the tunables are not really changing anything.

So I'm leaving them deleted. This is my first post on here after being a lurker for many months. Question 2: Does anyone have any idea why when I woke my computer up from sleep it refused to use the 10Gbe interface to transfer data? In the meantime, I decided to get my feet wet and go forward with setting up my system just to test and for fun—not placing anything valuable or important on it. In particular, I wanted to test my 10Gbe connection and have that ready to go.

The network cards are both installed in PCIe 2 x8 Slots getting full throughput. Both computers are connected directly to one another through the 10Gbe interfaces and are on a totally different network X from my main 1Gbe network I have read tons of guides online and watched youtube videos regarding how and what to do on the Windows computer side of things.

Last edited: Jun 7, Joined Dec 12, Messages What are your pool speeds? EDIT: Have you tried here? EDIT2: What's your full hardware? Joined Dec 13, Messages MauricioU said:. Hey all. How do I find what my pool speeds are? To make any meaningful suggestions, we really need the full tech specs of your client and NAS boxes.

This is why more accurate testing methodologies use 2x or 3x available RAM as a lower size limit for testing. If your system is still set up for testing, you could destroy the pool and recreate it as a stripe.

You can try with dd as said here.What is the maximum realistic bandwidth on a 10 Gig interface? Im setting up alarm thresholds and wondered what the peak actual performance of the interface was.

10gbe real world throughput

I haven't been able to find a clear answer. A given single 10 Gbps interface on a network switch or router is generally capable of line rate full 10 Gbps performance if the underlying platform or upstream neighbor throw that much traffic at it. Depending on the platform and what other interfaces are handling traffic, that may or may not be the final answer. Buy or Renew. Find A Community.

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What is the actual maximum throughput on Gigabit Ethernet?

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